Upcoming Events

Seminars and Workshops

Taking the Guesswork out of Mixed-Use Building Analysis

July 24, 2019—Albuquerque, NM
August 7, 2019—Pasadena, CA

While mixed-use buildings—which combine multiple occupancy types and/or functions in a single structure—are common, determining how to apply their unique mix of code requirements can be a daunting task. To simplify code analysis associated with these buildings, this presentation covers logical, code-compliant steps for a number of topics, including determining allowable building size, separation needs, detailing requirements, and the application of special provisions. With an emphasis on the use of wood framing in Construction Types III, IV and V, examples, calculations, and details will be presented to demonstrate how to navigate the various code requirements associated with mixed-use buildings while maximizing building size and meeting fire and life safety needs.

Attendees will qualify for 2 AIA/CES HSW LUs, 2 PDH credits or 0.2 ICC credits.

Breaking Convention with Timber Offices

August 6, 2019—Tulsa, OK

Great solutions often lie beyond convention. Consider that most offices in the U.S. could be built with a wood structure yet this option goes largely unexplored. Many designers assume they’re limited to concrete and steel for workplace environments—because that’s the common default—but, in fact, wood construction can accommodate the space and performance needs of office occupancies, while providing advantages such as speed, cost savings, and reduced environmental impact. Focusing on common design considerations (e.g., layout flexibility, land-use constraints, and market classification) this presentation will examine the potential for light-frame and heavy timber structural solutions. Topics will include building code opportunities related to fire and life safety, structural design and layout, and cost.

Attendees will qualify for 2 AIA/CES HSW LUs, 2 PDH credits or 0.2 ICC credits.

A Design Example of a Wood Cantilever Diaphragm

August 7, 2019—Austin, TX
August 7, 2019—San Antonio, TX
August 27, 2019—Charlotte, NC
August 28, 2019—Raleigh, NC
August 29, 2019—Atlanta, GA

Designers of modern low-rise and mid-rise multi-family buildings often face challenges due to fewer opportunities for shear walls at exterior wall lines (e.g., more glass and larger openings), increased building heights, and multi-story shear wall effects. While corridor-only shear walls are becoming more popular to address the lack of adequate exterior shear walls, methods of analysis for open-front structures are also evolving to reflect more complex building geometries. The goal of this presentation is to provide guidance on how to analyze an open-front or corridor-only shear wall diaphragm, and help engineers better understand flexibility issues associated with these types of structures. Although it will focus on seismic design of these conditions, comparison of wind and seismic design methods will also be covered.

The techniques and examples covered in this presentation are intended to demonstrate one method of analysis. It is anticipated that this information will serve as guidance for designers to consider and refine their own methods and techniques.

Attendees will qualify for 4 AIA/CES HSW LUs, 4 PDH credits or 0.4 ICC credits.

The Evolution of Mid-rise: New Opportunities + Key Design Considerations

August 12, 2019—Colorado Springs, CO
August 14, 2019—Denver, CO
August 15, 2019—Fort Collins, CO

Part I: The Evolution of Mid-Rise Design: Increasing Opportunities with Wood
The expanding use of wood-frame construction for mid-rise projects is allowing architects to creatively achieve multiple, simultaneous objectives. Wood can effectively meet code requirements while adding value and enabling the need for increased density in urban environments. Increasingly, wood buildings of five, six and more stories are rising up among traditional concrete and steel shells as designers and developers embrace timber’s vast potential for lower costs, faster installation, and a significantly lighter carbon footprint. Through the use of project examples, this session will illustrate trends in both residential and commercial mid-rise buildings. Topics will include current code allowances that offer opportunities for taller buildings, design strategies for improved building performance and code-compliant options for meeting fire and life safety requirements.

Part II: Accommodating Shrinkage in Multi-Story Wood-Frame Structures
In wood-frame buildings of three or more stories, cumulative shrinkage can be significant and have an impact on the function and performance of finishes, openings, mechanical/electrical/plumbing (MEP) systems, and structural connections. However, as more designers look to wood-frame construction to improve the cost and sustainability of their mid-rise projects, many have learned that accommodating wood shrinkage is actually very straightforward. This presentation will describe procedures for estimating wood shrinkage and provide detailing options that minimize its effects on building performance.

Attendees will qualify for 2 AIA/CES HSW LUs, 2 PDH credits or 0.2 ICC credits.

Type III Fire-Resistant Design + Wood in Commercial Buildings

August 20, 2019—Boise, ID
August 27, 2019—Spokane, WA

Type III Fire-Resistant Design and Detailing: Exterior Walls, Intersections and Balconies
The expanding use of wood-frame construction for mid-rise projects is allowing architects to A trend toward larger mid-rise wood-frame buildings has more designers seeking information on fire resistant detailing. This presentation will focus on common detailing issues and areas of misunderstanding related to exterior walls and their intersection with rated floor assemblies. Mid-rise wood-frame opportunities and code-specified building sizes will also be reviewed, followed by discussion of detailing code requirements, code compliance, and rationale for approval with an emphasis on constructability and practicality.

Opportunities for Wood Use in Low-Rise Commercial Buildings
This course is intended for designers who want to learn more about the use of wood-frame construction for low-rise retail, office and restaurant occupancies designed under the International Building Code. Topics covered include common framing systems and details, paths to code compliance and tall wall design.

Attendees will qualify for 2 AIA/CES HSW LUs, 2 PDH credits or 0.2 ICC credits.

Practical, Code-Compliant Detailing for Midrise Wood Structures

August 27, 2019—Hunstville, AL

With an increase in mid-rise wood-frame buildings, more designers are seeking information on code-compliant and constructible detailing. Many are unsure of the code’s requirements for details, specifically at the intersection of rated assemblies and where structure and fire protection meet. This presentation will focus on common detailing issues and areas of misunderstanding—including fire-resistance rating continuity, allowable uses of wood framing in shaft and fire walls, and fire safety principles associated with the intersection of two rated assemblies. Mid-rise wood-frame opportunities and code-specified building sizes will also be reviewed, followed by discussion of detailing code requirements, code compliance, and rationale for approval with an emphasis on constructability and practicality.

Attendees will qualify for 2 AIA/CES HSW LUs, 2 PDH credits or 0.2 ICC credits.

A New Path Forward for Tall Wood Construction: Code Provisions and Design Steps

August 27, 2019—Houston, TX
September 24, 2019—Dallas, TX

We are at an exciting confluence in timber construction. The need for sustainable, urban construction has never been higher. Concurrently, mass timber products such as cross-laminated timber have opened the door to many new opportunities for construction, one of which is tall wood. In January 2019, the International Code Council (ICC) approved a set of proposals to allow tall wood buildings of up to 18 stories as part of the 2021 International Building Code (IBC). This presentation will introduce the new tall wood code provisions in depth. Starting with a review of the technical research and testing that supported their adoption, it will then take a detailed look at the new code provisions and methods of addressing the new requirements. Topics will include fire-resistance ratings and allowances for exposed timber, penetrations, sprinklers, connections, exterior walls and much more. Designers can expect to take away the knowledge they need to start exploring tall wood designs on their projects.

Attendees will qualify for 2 AIA/CES HSW LUs, 2 PDH credits or 0.2 ICC credits.

Mass Timber Construction: Products, Performance and Design

August 28, 2019—Alabaster, AL

Due to their high strength, dimensional stability and positive environmental performance, mass timber building products are quickly becoming materials of choice for sustainably-minded designers. This presentation will provide a detailed look at the variety of mass timber products available, including glue-laminated timber (glulam), cross laminated timber (CLT), nail laminated timber (NLT), heavy timber decking, and other engineered and composite systems. Applications for the use of these products under modern building codes will be discussed, and examples of their use in U.S. projects reviewed. Mass timber’s ability to act as both structure and exposed finish will also be highlighted, as will its performance as part of an assembly, considering design objectives related to structural performance, fire resistance, acoustics, and energy efficiency. Other topics will include detailing and construction best practices, lessons learned from completed projects and trends for the increased use of mass timber products in the future.

Attendees will qualify for 2 AIA/CES HSW LUs, 2 PDH credits or 0.2 ICC credits.

Seismic Design of a Wood Cantilever, Open-Front Diaphragm

September 10, 2019—Seattle, WA
September 11, 2019—Portland, OR
September 12, 2019—San Diego, CA

Designers of modern low-rise and mid-rise multi-family buildings often face challenges due to fewer opportunities for shear walls at exterior wall lines (e.g., more glass and larger openings), increased building heights, and multi-story shear wall effects. While corridor-only shear walls are becoming more popular to address the lack of adequate exterior shear walls, methods of analysis for open-front structures are also evolving to reflect more complex building geometries. The goal of this presentation is to provide guidance on how to analyze an open-front or corridor-only shear wall diaphragm, and help engineers better understand flexibility issues associated with these types of structures. Although it will focus on seismic design of these conditions, comparison of wind and seismic design methods will also be covered.

The techniques and examples covered in this presentation are intended to demonstrate one method of analysis. It is anticipated that this information will serve as guidance for designers to consider and refine their own methods and techniques.

Attendees will qualify for 4 AIA/CES HSW LUs, 4 PDH credits or 0.4 ICC credits.

Mass Timber in the Midwest: Value + Distinction through the Lens of Two Projects

September 11, 2019—Richmond Heights, MO
September 12, 2019—Kansas City, MO

Inspiration for building designs comes in many forms. For some, the desire to use mass timber is anchored in its sustainability and light carbon footprint. For others, speed of construction and aesthetics are the driving factors. This panel presentation will examine its use from multiple perspectives. Beginning with a baseline of practical knowledge, it will cover building code allowances, and design and detailing steps for fire resistance, acoustics, construction type selection, structural grid, and more. From there, two architects will share their insights through the lens of completed mass timber projects: The University of Arkansas Stadium Drive Student Residence Hall in Fayetteville, AR and the East Grand office building in Des Moines, IA. They’ll discuss key issues from design through construction, including fire and life safety, code-compliance, material procurement, design trade coordination, and construction efficiency.

Attendees will qualify for 3 AIA/CES HSW LUs, 3 PDH credits or 0.3 ICC credits.

Mid-Rise and Taller Wood Buildings: The Growing Landscape

September 11, 2019—Washington, DC
September 12, 2019—Baltimore, MD

Innovative use of wood is changing the skyline. Increasingly, mid-rise wood buildings are rising up among traditional concrete and steel shells as designers and developers recognize timber’s performance capabilities while embracing its vast potential for lower costs, faster installation, and a significantly lighter carbon footprint. Through the use of case studies, this session will showcase recently completed projects that illustrate this trend. Topics will include current code allowances for mid-rise wood buildings, design strategies and environmental performance. Discussion will then shift to taller wood buildings, made possible by emerging research and the development of advanced wood products and technologies. Project examples will be highlighted and design approaches for topics such as fire-resistance, structure and acoustics will be covered.

Attendees will qualify for 2 AIA/CES HSW LUs, 2 PDH credits or 0.2 ICC credits.

Symposiums, Conferences and Courses

Mid-Atlantic Wood Design Symposium

September 19, 2019—Philadelphia, PA

A Wood Design Symposium is a multi-faceted educational event on the use of wood in commercial and multi-family buildings.

Attendees can earn up to 5.5 AIA/CES HSW LUs, 5.5 PDH credits, or 0.55 ICC credits (one per attended seminar). Professional Development Certificates (AIA/CES and ICC) will be available on site.

Northeast Wood Design Symposium

October 16, 2019—Portland, ME

A Wood Design Symposium is a multi-faceted educational event on the use of wood in commercial and multi-family buildings.

Attendees can earn up to 5.5 AIA/CES HSW LUs, 5.5 PDH credits, or 0.55 ICC credits (one per attended seminar). Professional Development Certificates (AIA/CES and ICC) will be available on site.

Timber-Strong Design Build Competition

November 12, 2019—Anaheim, CA

NCSEA has partnered with APA – the Engineered Wood Association, the American Wood Council and Simpson Strong-Tie to bring the Timber-Strong Design Build Competition to Structural Engineers Associations. This competition is intended to give university engineering students a real world experience. Student teams will prepare a project complete with a preliminary design, material cost estimates, structural calculations and estimated carbon footprint. It provides an opportunity for students to experience the full spectrum of designing and building a real project in a team environment. The on-site building portion of the competition will take place at the NCSEA Structural Engineering Summit, on November 12th at the Disneyland Hotel.

Southern California Wood Design Symposium

November 13, 2019—Long Beach, CA

A Wood Design Symposium is a multi-faceted educational event on the use of wood in commercial and multi-family buildings.

Attendees can earn up to 5.5 AIA/CES HSW LUs, 5.5 PDH credits, or 0.55 ICC credits (one per attended seminar). Professional Development Certificates (AIA/CES and ICC) will be available on site.

Webinars

Mass Timber Connections: Building Structural Design Skills

August 14, 2019—12:00 pm–1:00 pm CDT

For engineers new to mass timber design, connections can pose a particular challenge. This webinar focuses on connection design principles and analysis techniques unique to mass timber products such as cross-laminated timber, glued-laminated timber and nail-laminated timber. The session will focus on connection design options ranging from commodity fasteners and pre-engineered wood products to custom-designed solutions. Discussion will also include a review of timber mechanics and load transfer, as well as considerations such as tolerances, fabrication, durability, fire, and shrinkage that are relevant to structural design.

Attendees will qualify for 1 AIA/CES HSW LU, 1 PDH credit or 0.1 ICC credit (FBPE board-approved).

2018 IBC Essentials for Wood Construction

August 15, 2019—9:55-11:30 am CDT
August 15, 2019—12:55-2:30 pm CDT

Based on the popular Code Conforming Wood Design (CCWD), a joint publication of the American Wood Council (AWC) and the International Code Council (ICC), this presentation concisely summarizes the 2018 International Building Code (IBC) for commercial and multi-family residential construction. It will explain the determination of maximum building size for eight common use groups using the height and area tables of the 2018 IBC and pre-calculated tables provided in the CCWD. It will also address establishing fire resistance for wood assemblies and heavy timber; special provisions for pedestal buildings; criteria for finishes, appendages, and other wood features; the scoping of referenced wood design standards; an overview of structural provisions in Chapter 23; and requirements for precautions during construction.

Equivalencies: 1.5 Hour of Instruction = 0.15 Continuing Education Units (CEU) = 1.5 Professional Development Hours (PDH) = 1.5 Learning Units (LU)

Structural Mass Timber Design: The Engineers Role in Optimization

September 11, 2019—12:00 pm–1:00 pm CDT

Achieving the highest level of cost efficiency possible with mass timber requires an understanding of both material properties and manufacturer capabilities. When it comes to laying out a structural grid, the square peg/round hole analogy is pertinent. Trying to force a mass timber solution on a grid laid out for steel or concrete can result in member size inefficiencies and the inability to leverage manufacturer capabilities. Knowing how to best lay out the grid—without sacrificing space functionality—allows the designer to optimize member sizes, but cost efficiency for a mass timber building goes beyond column spacing. This presentation will examine the structural engineer’s role in optimizing a mass timber structural layout by taking a systems vs. product approach. Topics will include known parameters for mass timber design, design challenges, connections, grid spacings, and lessons learned from the structural design of Colorado mass timber projects.

Attendees will qualify for 1 AIA/CES HSW LU, 1 PDH credit or 0.1 ICC credit (FBPE board-approved).

Achieving the Imperative of High-Performance Multi-Family Housing with Wood Construction

October 9, 2019—12:00 pm–1:00 pm CDT

A growing belief among design and construction professionals is that simply building to the energy code’s baseline minimums is no longer good enough. One approach that’s becoming increasingly popular for multi-family projects is passive house design. The Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency (PHFA), which has funded 17 multi-family passive house projects, is propelling the affordable housing industry toward a net-zero energy standard by 2030. This initiative has proved a catalyst for the significant expansion of passive house/net-zero-capable housing, inspiring 14 more states to similarly incentivize passive house through their low-income housing tax credit programs. This webinar will share cost data, strategies, and lessons learned through completed passive house projects nationwide, demonstrating the radical, affordable, and scalable way the affordable housing industry is combatting climate change through improved energy performance.

Attendees will qualify for 1 AIA/CES HSW LU, 1 PDH credit or 0.1 ICC credit (FBPE board-approved).

Integrating Passive House Concepts into Everyday Enclosure Design

November 13, 2019—12:00 pm–1:00 pm CDT

To some design and construction professionals, the term ‘passive house’ carries connotations of added expense, difficult details and super-thick walls and roofs. However, for larger scale multi-family and commercial buildings, the concepts of passive house design can be easily implemented with a proper understanding of the core principles and guiding design techniques. Passive house can provide deep operational energy reductions through its core principles of entire building air tightness, minimal thermal bridging, and a balanced and appropriately-sized mechanical ventilation system. This webinar will draw on these guiding principles to illustrate how passive house concepts can be integrated into a number of wood-frame project types—including mid-rise multi-family, low-rise commercial, and tall wood buildings. Enclosure detailing techniques, construction cost impacts, and energy savings potential will be illustrated with an emphasis on repeatable and scalable strategies.

Attendees will qualify for 1 AIA/CES HSW LU, 1 PDH credit or 0.1 ICC credit (FBPE board-approved).